Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2012

Ke$ha (one of Nashville Zoo’s Tamanduas) and I wish you

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2012
 Frohe Weihnachten und ein Gutes Neues Jahr 2012
  Geseënde Kersfees en ‘n ​​Voorspoedige Nuwe Jaar 2012
   Ngikufisela uKhisimusi oMuhle noNyaka oMusha oNempumelelo
    Feliz Navidad y un Feliz Año Nuevo 2012
     圣诞快乐,新年快乐2012年
     Joyeux Noël et une Bonne Année 2012
    Schöni Wienachte und en guete Rutsch is neue Johr
   Buon Natale e un Felice Anno Nuovo 2012
  Cras et sem a Kalendis MMXII
 Wesołych Świąt i Szczęśliwego Nowego Roku 2012
Bonan Kristnaskon kaj feliĉan novan jaron

Try to identify the languages for these Holiday greeting – scroll down to see the answer.

I got this colorful, hand-made Christmas card from a Nashville Zoo fan in Argentina.
He incorporated 20 of Nashville Zoo’s species into the picture (Rhinoceros Hornbill, Caribbean Flamingo, Red Panda, White-cheeked Gibbon, Bengal Tiger, Ostrich, Cougar, Damara Zebra, Eland, Masai Giraffe, Baird’s Tapir, African Elephant, Giant Anteater, Red-tailed Monkey, Eurasian Lynx, Rhinoceros Iguana, Tuco Toucan, Ringd-tailed Lemur, American Alligator and Clouded Leopard). Well done and thank you Flavio!

And here are the languages from the Holiday message: English, German, Afrikaans, Zulu, Spanish, Chinese, French, Swiss-German, Spanish, Latin, Polish and Esperanto.

I will be in Germany and Switzerland from December 21 to December 29. All the best – Christian

Picture of the Week 43 – Halloween

This week’s picture is of a small Tamandua at Nashville Zoo celebrating Halloween with a giant pumpkin 🙂

Enjoy the picture!

About Tamanduas:
Tamandua is a genus of anteaters. It has two members: the Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) and the Northern Tamandua (Tamandua mexicana). They live in forests and grasslands and possess partially prehensile tails. They mainly eat ants and termites. In captivity, they will eat fruits and meat. They have no teeth and depend on their powerful gizzard to break down their food. Besides the tamanduas, there are two other anteaters, the Giant Anteater and the Silky Anteater. Tamanduas are much smaller than the Giant Anteater, but are larger than the Silky Anteater. The word tamanduá is Tupi for “anteater”, and in Tupi and Portuguese refers to anteaters in general. The tamandua is called in those languages tamanduá-mirim (mirim means “small”).